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Browsing items in: Football

(122 results)



Display: 20



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    • The classic Federal eagle was adopted by Col Gignilliat shortly after he became Superintendent in 1910. Many variations were presented for his approval. In the uniform design, the eagle was perched on a branch. However, the eagle used in...


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    • Company D, 1924. The Corps was divided into two divisions, the White and the Maroon. Five game schedules were the rule with time built into the schedule to permit for playoffs.


    • 1894 – 1899;
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    • Football began at the Culver Military Academy in the fall of 1895 under the tutelage of Dr. William Yeager, a PhD and graduate of Leipzig University in Germany. He instructed Modern Language and Science. He arrived in the U.S. with a large family,...


    • 1894 – 1899;
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    • Yeager was lacking in football knowledge but bought the impression of maturity to a team in formation. The real coaching duties fell to his younger assistance, Arthur Stewart.


    • 1894 – 1899;
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    • Arthur Stewart, an Amherst graduate, was the assistant football coach for the seasons 1895-96. An instructor in Science (Chemistry and Physics), he had played football at Amherst and knew the game. His bushy mustache belied his youth. On several...


    • 1894 – 1899;
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    • The 1895 football team was coached by William Jaeger (l) and Alfred Stewart (mustache). The Academy cook is a back left. When injuries reduced the available players, Stewart would suit up and play. Still short a player in a game against Shortridge...


    • 1894 – 1899;
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    • Early teams wore a variety of "uniforms." Culver's colors were maroon and white but without color film and processing, it's impossible to determine what the conglomeration of outfits were. No record of this team is available. Enrollment was 122.


    • 1894 – 1899;
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    • The 1897 team was photographed wearing striped shirts and long socks. Shin guards were standard equipment, but helmets are not evident. The 1897 team had a record of 7-1. The single loss was to Terre Haute, Ind. by a score of 4-0. Enrollment was...


    • 1894 – 1899;
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    • The 1898 team had a record of 5-1-1.. Football injuries had yet to reach the concern that led to the study of college and school football initiated by Theodore Roosevelt in 1905. However, protective gear including leather nose protectors and shin...


    • 1894 – 1899;
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    • Previous to 1899, Academy teams lacked a school identification. The 1899 squad appeared for the first time with a monogrammed "CMA" on each football jersey. It was a step forward in establishing a school identity. The difficult issue, however, is...


    • 1894 – 1899;
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    • Gignilliat's concern about establishing a symbol of Culver's visual identity was satisfied in the spring of 1899 with the creation of the Culver "C" wrapped around the letters "ulver." It was an accidental happening. Two cadets had pressed a...


    • 1894 – 1899;
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    • For its first five years, the Academy was striving for an identity. The driven leader for all things involving publicity was Commandant Gignilliat. He recognized the potential of photography and determined to document Culver's growth. In 1899, he...


    • 1894 – 1899;
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    • Gignilliat's search for an appropriate identifier, i.e. a logo - was solved when cadets Harry Fitton and Harrison Schults, while wasting away a Sunday afternoon, pressed a horseshoe into wet sand and casually scribed "ulver" within its interior....


    • 1900 - 1909;
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    • The 1901 season had an awkward season, winning five and losing 4. However, one of the victories was remarkable. Culver defeated Laporte 102-0. The Chicago Tribune labeled it "the third worst thrashing in the history of football. The cadet...


    • 1900 - 1909;
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    • Culver celebrated its second undefeated football season in the fall of 1902. Their record was 9-0, and they scored 301 to opponents 11. Academy enrollment was 257. An observation regarding the hair styles at the end of the century is appropriate....


    • 1900 - 1909;
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    • Not to to be outdone by the Class of 1902, the 1903 team was also undefeated, scoring 353 points against the opponents 16. This squad went one game better, however, winning ten to no losses. The 1903-04 enrollment was 270.


    • 1900 - 1909;
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    • The Class of 1904-05 fielded fine team that came within one game, a loss to Purdue, of an undefeated season. The 1904-05 enrollment was 302 and squads were small.


    • 1900 - 1909;
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    • Hat and cap ornaments and other identifying symbols were part of the military regalia. The eagle had long been accepted by military units and in 1906 the Academy made it part of the uniform issue. It remained in use until 1910.


    • 1900 - 1909;
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    • Several type variations of "Culver" appeared in Academy publications. This is one of the first on catalogs and appears typical of dramatic designs frequently used in publications.


    • 1900 - 1909;
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    • The "swooping" eagle was used on hat and cap ornaments from about 1899 to 1908. Quality of the item varied but Gignilliat insisted on a bright shine.

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